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USC Marshall establishes one of the most highly advanced eye-tracking labs at any U.S. business school

October 10, 2019
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The USC Marshall School of Business has expanded its behavioral research laboratory with the addition of a set of state-of-the-art eye-tracking systems. Already equipped with advanced audio, video and face-reader software, the lab became one of the finest at a business school in the United States with the acquisition of multiple Tobii eye-trackers.

The eye-trackers record where participants look on a screen and in what order, enabling researchers to capture “visual attention,” said Associate Professor in Finance and Business Economics, Cary Frydman, who uses the equipment for his work in neurofinance. “They enable us to measure the participant’s choice process, in addition to the ultimate choice. This helps us understand the influence of information architecture on economic behavior.”

“Having a top-of-the-line lab at Marshall provides a unique tool for behavioral researchers as well as people in data sciences and operations, and finance and business economics. Marshall is now among the few institutions that can provide this resource.”— Kristin Diehl, professor of marketing

Frydman helped purchase the eye-trackers with funding from a National Science Foundation CAREER grant he was awarded in 2018. His contribution supplemented support from Marshall’s Institute for Outlier Research (iORB). Four faculty members from FBE and marketing partnered on the iORB funding proposal.

In addition to the elite equipment, the lab is distinctive because it is located within a business school.

“The majority of researchers in finance, management, and marketing have not been using eye tracking to record the attention process,” said Kristin Diehl, professor of marketing and one of the faculty members on the iORB grant proposal. “But having a top-of-the-line lab at Marshall provides a unique tool for behavioral researchers as well as people in data sciences and operations, and finance and business economics. Marshall is now among the few institutions that can provide this resource.”