University of Southern California

About Us

The quality of our people is what makes the Leventhal School of Accounting an innovator in the areas of accounting education and critical research. Our faculty have designed educational programs structured to develop in each graduate the potential for career advancement into the highest levels of professional accounting and management. We are committed to creating knowledge and disseminating it through leading academic and professional journals and symposia. Our students have the capability and motivation to succeed in a rigorous educational environment at undergraduate, masters, and doctoral program levels. Our excellent staff is dedicated to support our mission with timeliness, quality, and personal assistance to everyone in Leventhal.

Importantly, Leventhal resides within the highly rated Marshall School of Business, which provides our students opportunities to interact with the high-quality faculty at Marshall. Our faculty have definitely noticed the growth in the quality of the students at the University of Southern California in all programs. Students are very receptive to learning about and discussing new ideas and their impact on the world of accounting and business.

Leventhal provides a state-of-the-art education in a vibrant urban setting, close ties with the accounting and business communities, a Pacific Rim location that helps us maintain an international focus, and a long-standing tradition of excellence in accounting. Our website is designed to assist you in finding out more about our programs and our people.

History

Accounting education has been an integral part of the School of Business at USC since its inception in 1920. At that time, the Department of Accounting offered a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration with an emphasis in accounting. Later development included the Master of Business Administration with an optional accounting track and a doctoral program. In 1954, the Master of Accounting (MAcc) program was established as a post-baccalaureate program for those wishing to specialize in accounting. In 1974, the Master of Business Taxation (MBT) program was developed.

In the early 1970s, the AICPA Committee on Accounting Education strongly endorsed the idea of establishing schools of accounting. As department chairman and member of the business school's executive council in 1977, Andy Mosich realized that to achieve USC's goal of becoming a preeminent accounting program, it must find a "heavyweight" to chair the department and work towards establishing it as a school. USC found its man in Doyle Z. Williams of Texas Tech University, a man who was highly regarded by both academics and practitioners in the profession.